A Creative Communication and Accessible Arts Project, funded by disability services provider Endeavour Foundation’s Endowment Challenge Fund, is set to showcase local talent at this year’s Ashford Salami Festival (Saturday 15 October).

The project, which began in September, is designed to increase participation for people marginalised through factors such as disability and illness. With the classes already highlighting how arts and creativity can increase community participation, self-esteem and self-worth, reduce anxiety, and generally increase happiness, Ashford woman Gloria Sylvester’s only concern is that the project will ultimately end, and is keen to continue to explore her new-found enthusiasm for art.

"I love it! The girls look after us, and I love the work we do. It makes me happier,” she said.

Made possible through funding from disability service provider Endeavour Foundation’s Endowment Challenge Fund, and managed by the Ashford Business Council, the workshops’ participants come from both the Ashford and Inverell areas.

Arts Coordinator Jenny Blackey said that the project is already paying dividends.

“Each person in the group has shown greater enthusiasm and interest in the activities each week. We have some really nice artworks getting done and it's been great to see how much interest and pride each person takes in their artwork.”

Support coordinator Abby Hooker said that the program's benefits are 'immeasurable', as it creates opportunities to engage with different members of the community and be involved in art forms that participants have never been exposed to.

"Unfortunately people in the community with disability miss out on a lot of mainstream events due to financial constraints, or struggling to fit into groups that are already established, and this art program has made art and creativity accessible and comfortable," Abby said.

Project participants are excited about displaying their art at the Ashford Salami Festival, where members of the wider community will be invited to participate in some art activities.

The Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund is a registered not-for-profit charity that seeks to benefit the wider Australian disability sector as a whole, with an emphasis on inclusion for people with an intellectual disability. For further details go to www.endowmentchallengefund.com.au .

Creative Communication and Accessible Arts Project
Gloria Sylvester
Colleen Malinen and John Bennett

Contact: Emma Edwards, Media and Public Relations Manager, Endeavour Foundation;
P: (07) 3908 7543 – M: 0472 809 503 – E: e.edwards@endeavour.com.au

David WaldieIndel-ABILITY Arts, an inclusive theatre company formed by artists who identify as having a disability, is set to raise the curtain on its first ever production on 7 September at the Brisbane Powerhouse.

‘Look Mum… No Hands!!!’, a performance funded by Endeavour Foundation’s Endowment Challenge Fund, offers an entertaining and eye-opening insight into the pursuit of artistic recognition in a creative world that struggles with difference.

Through dialogue, music and humour, the audience is given a searingly honest peek into the lived experience of disability.

One of two successful Q Art Non-Profit awards from the Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund, the grant was announced by CEO Andrew Donne.

“We’re extremely pleased to be able to help support the provision of an accessible theatre experience,” Mr Donne said.

“We know that people with a disability have so much to offer our communities, and we’re delighted to support this innovative and inclusive enterprise.”

The performance, which celebrates individual journeys towards independence – in both form and content – aims to challenge preconceptions about disability.

Madeleine LittleCo-Artistic Directors Rebecca Roberts and Catarina Hebbard are excited by the project’s potential.

“Thanks to the Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund we will be able to increase audience inclusion and create new partnerships within the performing arts industry.

“It is vital that we make each and every show as accessible as possible and, to that end, the grant will also enable us to up-skill our performers in AUSLAN.”

The company’s Brisbane Powerhouse debut will be followed by a one-off show at the Redlands Performing Arts Centre on 2 September, which will include a workshop on inclusive theatre for audience members and the general public.

The Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund is a registered not-for-profit charity that seeks to benefit the wider Australian disability sector as a whole, with an emphasis on inclusion for people with an intellectual disability.

It is a capital-preserved fund, with donations invested and interest earned used to support Endowment Challenge Fund annual grants.

For further details go to www.endowmentchallengefund.com.au .

Contact: Emma Edwards, Media and Public Relations Manager, Endeavour Foundation;
P: (07) 3908 7543 – M: 0472 809 503 – E: e.edwards@endeavour.com.au

A partnership between Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and disability services provider, Endeavour Foundation, is taking virtual reality out of the gaming sector and into the real world of disability.

The project, part funded via a grant from Endeavour Foundation’s Endowment Challenge Fund, will seek to use digital technology to increase independence and capability for people with an intellectual disability.

Endeavour Foundation CEO, Andrew Donne, said that the sector must capitalise upon the momentum generated by the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

“People with an intellectual disability – despite the best efforts of their families - have too often been relegated to the sidelines of our communities. We’re now in the midst of an incredible change, but to succeed it has to extend beyond systems and into society. The NDIS must not be the crest of the wave.

“We’re delighted that, with our partners, QUT, we’re on the front foot in offering meaningful solutions for a technologically savvy generation.”

Lead researcher, Laurianne Sitbon, said that the Virtual Learning Environment enables students to learn about real world situations but within the safety of a virtual world.

“As a technology it’s effective and engaging, but it’s also hugely appealing to young people,” she said.

“In this application, you are participating in a virtual reality scenario which includes using public transport to travel across Brisbane and visit a café. The activity, which acts like a video game, teaches important life skills – buying and operating a travel card, getting on and off transport, ordering food, using money and interacting with people.

“This grant will enable us to take the process a step further and use new 360 degree video techniques to generate immersive video replays of a variety of scenarios in public spaces.

“To date these skills have been taught by support staff in the real situation – a costly and time-consuming operation – so we’re focused on finding the best possible techniques. We will provide support organizations and families with guidelines on how to decide which settings to consider for their individual needs, and clear instructions to create their own videos.

“This technology is all about flexibility, responsiveness and helping people with a disability achieve as much independence as possible.”

This year The Endowment Challenge Fund also gave an award of over $4,000 to a higher degree student and made a total of over $25,000 available to non-profit organisations.

The Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund is a registered not-for-profit charity that seeks to benefit the wider Australian disability sector as a whole, with an emphasis on people with an intellectual disability.

It is a capital-preserved fund, with donations invested and interest earned used to support Endowment Challenge Fund annual grants.

Contact: Emma Edwards, Media and Public Relations Manager, Endeavour Foundation;
P: (07) 3908 7543 – M: 0472 809 503 – E: e.edwards@endeavour.com.au

Waminda’s Grounds Maintenance Service is an innovative program within the Dalby community, offering open employment opportunities in tandem with jobs for people with a disability. Now, thanks to a $12,000 Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund grant, the social enterprise can buy new equipment and tender for even more projects.

One of three successful non-profit awards from the Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund, the grant was announced by Endeavour Foundation CEO Andrew Donne.

“We’re extremely pleased to be able to help such a valuable social enterprise grow and sustain itself into the future,” Mr Donne said.

“We know that people with a disability have so much to offer our communities, and we’re delighted to support an enterprise which is committed to inclusivity.”

Waminda General Manager, Malcolm Irvine, said: “This generous grant has been spent in Dalby to buy a new lawnmower, brush-cutters, a pressure cleaner and safety clothing for our team. We will spend some of the grant on advertising and marketing our enterprise. What this means for Waminda is that the money we earn goes on wages for people in the community who live with a disability. For the community, it means local money is spent locally.”

Brothers Beau, 26, and David Jye Sandeman, 30, have found the experience life changing.

“After three years without a job, Waminda gave me an opportunity. I was in a really bad way and they’ve bent over backwards for me,” David said.

“Now we’ve got the new gear we’re in pretty good shape, so we can take on anything anyone needs around town.”

His younger brother Beau says he relishes the opportunity to meet people.

“Waminda have been pretty good to me – as well as our jobs they’ve helped us move into our own place and even helped us with furniture.

“I enjoy the work too. Doing the mowing is fun, because I use the ride-on, but I also like that we go to lots of different buildings and we’re able to meet people and help people.”

The Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund is a registered not-for-profit charity that seeks to benefit the wider Australian disability sector as a whole, with an emphasis on inclusion for people with an intellectual disability.

It is a capital-preserved fund, with donations invested and interest earned used to support Endowment Challenge Fund annual grants.

For further details go to www.endowmentchallengefund.com.au .

Contact: Emma Edwards, Media and Public Relations Manager, Endeavour Foundation;
P: (07) 3908 7543 – M: 0472 809 503 – E: e.edwards@endeavour.com.au

Endeavour Foundation Chief Executive, Andrew Donne, has said that the charity is proud to support research into anxiety treatment for adults on the autism spectrum.

“Anxiety disorder can affect up to 84% of individuals on the autism spectrum, significantly impacting upon quality of life - above and beyond the effect of autism spectrum disorder itself,” Mr Donne said.

“We’re pleased that, through Endeavour Foundation’s Endowment Challenge Fund, we can support research which will make a practical difference in the lives of those on the spectrum.”

The grant will fund a series of animation videos, which will be employed within an anxiety intervention program for adults using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). This project is part of a wider Autism CRC research program to empower adults on the autism spectrum to improve their health and wellbeing.

Cindy Nicollet, lead researcher and Student Award recipient, said that this program is unique in targeting adults.

“Managing anxiety is part of everyday lives for many autistic people as the neurotypical world is filled with implicit social contracts and norms that can be very difficult to navigate. This can lead to increased anxiety and potentially social isolation,” Ms Nicollet said.

“A pilot program will run as a free anxiety intervention for autistic adults and we will be asking participants to provide feedback on its acceptability and appropriateness.”

Information gathered through the pilot program will be used to refine the anxiety program which can then be rolled out nationally to support thousands of autistic adults to manage their anxiety.

For more information visit www.autismcrc.com.au/adult-anxiety-program or contact Cindy Nicollet directly on 07 3163 2496 or c.nicollet@uq.edu.au .

For further details on Endeavour Foundation’s Endowment Challenge Fund go to www.endowmentchallengefund.com.au .

Contact: Emma Edwards, Media and Public Relations Manager, Endeavour Foundation;
P: (07) 3908 7543 – M: 0472 809 503 – E: e.edwards@endeavour.com.au

Research team develops a framework to evaluate organisational person-centredness by people with intellectual disability

Winners of the 2015 Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund grants have been announced by Endeavour Foundation Chief Executive Officer, David Barbagallo.

This year’s grant recipients share in a funding pool of $70,000 and are again expected to make an immense contribution to the lives of people with a disability.

“These grants encourage ground-breaking research into the issues that really matter for the Australian disability sector. They also foster inclusion of people with a disability,” Mr Barbagallo said.

“I am immensely proud to announce this year’s recipients, who are all playing their part and doing incredible work,” Mr Barbagallo said.

The Inclusive Research Network, at the Centre for Disability Studies at Sydney University’s Medical Faculty, will use a $40,000 grant to develop and trial a set of person centredness indicators based on the perspectives of 30 people with intellectual disability using Sydney disability organisations.

Among the three non-profit awards granted in 2015, Sydney’s Bushlink, a social enterprise run by Northside Enterprise Incorporated, will use a $10,000 grant to buy new equipment to expand their bush regeneration work and enhance community participation for people with intellectual disability.

Sunshine Coast’s The Compass Institute provides paid employment to 35 people with a disability through its Rakes and Panes garden maintenance and window cleaning business. With a $4000 Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund grant, the business can buy four new accessible lawn-mowers to support the workers’ independence.

The Prader-Willi Syndrome Association of Victoria will use its grant to expand online support services to families of children newly-diagnosed with the rare genetic disorder.

Curtin University Masters student Caris Jalla has earned $5000 for her research into perceptions of health, wellbeing and disability by Aboriginal children and young people both with and without a diagnosed disability.

PhD student at the University of South Australia, Sujatha Raj, will investigate how occupational therapy intervention can help slow the functional decline of people with Down Syndrome and Alzheimer’s-type dementia disease.

In previous years the fund has helped fund a range of innovative disability-specific projects to:

  • train community workers to include young people with a disability in camps and holiday activities,
  • develop programs to prevent sexual assault and help victims to recover,
  • create an online self-reporting system for teens with mental health concerns, and
  • foster service access for people with a mental health concern.

Established in 2009, the Endowment Challenge Fund has supported important projects - large and small – that improve the lives of people with a disability nationwide. The fund is also providing vital tools to help people with a disability prepare for the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

From buying lawn mowers for small social enterprises, to supporting complex research projects, the Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund has provided more than $290,000 to worthy and ground-breaking projects supporting people with a disability.

Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund chairman Grant Murdoch said the grants all focused on improving the lives of people with a disability.

“People with a disability are often overlooked. We have made it our mission to change this through better inclusion in society, and with greater knowledge through research excellence,” Mr Murdoch said.

The Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund is a registered not-for-profit charity that seeks to benefit the wider Australian disability sector as a whole, with an emphasis on people with an intellectual disability.

It is a capital-preserved fund, with donations invested and interest earned used to support Endowment Challenge Fund annual grants. For more information about the fund go to: www.endowmentchallengefund.com.au.

Contact: Kirrily Boulton, National Media & Communications Manager, Endeavour Foundation;
P: 0429 077 886;
email k.boulton@endeavour.com.au

Tablet-based tool to help teens with a disability say How I’m Feeling

Researchers will pilot a new assessment tool to help diagnosis of mental health conditions in young people with an intellectual disability thanks to a $40,000 grant from the Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund.

The study by a team from Melbourne’s Monash University, led by Associate Professor Kylie Gray, will pilot a newly developed self-assessment tool to assess its validity and reliability.

The team will pilot the accessible web-based tool, which will be delivered to young people with an intellectual disability via a tablet computer, to determine their levels of anxiety and depression.

Chairperson of the Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund Grant Murdoch said if the How I’m Feeling study pilot is successful it would improve the ability of clinicians to detect mental health conditions.

“We know that it’s common for people living with an intellectual disability to also suffer a mental health condition, but diagnosis is difficult because behaviours associated with the presence of an intellectual disability may mask symptoms of mental health issues,” Mr Murdoch said.

“We need to better understand this impact of dual disability, and this project can lay the groundwork for more appropriate support.”

The annual Endowment Challenge Fund provides grants to researchers and postgraduate students undertaking research into significant issues for the Australian disability sector.

Mr Murdoch said the Endowment Challenge Fund granted another four projects that each have a practical impact on the day-to-day lives of people living with a disability.

With workforce participation of people with a disability on the Federal Government’s agenda, Queensland University of Technology (QUT) student Katherine Moore has been awarded the 2014 Student Award of $5,000 to research how organisations embed disability employment practices within their social structures.

The research will focus on increasing the participation of people with a disability working in the retail sector, and the findings will contribute to an understanding of everyday practices around disability employment within organisational settings.

The 2014 Non-Profit Organisation Award will be granted to three organisations this year.

Mid North Coast Community Care Options Inc, in Coffs Harbour, will receive $20,000 to conduct community education workshops and produce a documentary film aimed at reducing barriers and increasing meaningful community participation.

Mr Murdoch said the project would aim to make social, sporting and recreational activities more ‘disability friendly’ within the Coffs Harbour and Bellingen regions.

“Experience has shown the Mid North Coast Community Care Options organisation that some groups within the local communities are ready to include members with specific support needs, but many are still uncertain about how to do this,” he said.

“The funding for this project will build community capacity for social inclusion through a series of workshops and the documentary. Already 40 groups in the mid North Coast region of New South Wales have indicated their desire to participate in this project.”

Non-government organisation Melba Support Services in Mt Evelyn, Victoria, will be awarded $4,000 to support local people with a disability to work in The Able Bake House, a social enterprise creating job opportunities in baking, packaging, marketing, sales and delivery.

A small grant for the Caboolture Disability Indoor Cricket Inc will be used to buy cricket bats and protective equipment for people with a disability who are club members. The club focuses on providing an inclusive sporting pathway for people with a disability to take their sporting abilities to the representative level. The Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund is a public benevolent institution that seeks to benefit the wider Australian disability sector as a whole, with an emphasis on people with an intellectual disability.

The Endowment Challenge Fund is a capital-preserved fund where donations made to the fund are invested and the interest earned is used to support Endowment Challenge Fund activities.

More information about the fund is available at http://www.endowmentchallengefund.com.au/

Contact: Kirrily Boulton, National Media & Communications Manager, Endeavour Foundation;
P: 0429 077 886;
email k.boulton@endeavour.com.au

New resource supports NDIS decision-making by people with a disability

Endeavour Foundation and Griffith University have developed a unique resource which will make it easier for people with a disability take charge of their decisions, under the new National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

The 'My Choices Tree' maps out a series of questions for people to ask themselves about their support requirements, and then points them in the direction they need to go.

Griffith University received funding from the Endeavour Foundation's Endowment Challenge Fund to develop the new tool, which will support people with a disability, families and decision-makers, as they navigate their way through the processes of the new NDIS system.

The My Choices Tree will also help people understand the kinds of choices and self-determination that will be available after the NDIS reforms.

Griffith University researchers, Associate Professor Heidi Muenchberger and Senior Research Assistant Michelle Crozier, have been leading the way in what Endeavour Foundation CEO David Barbagallo described as "highly relevant, timely and nationally significant research".

The self-direction pre-planning My Choices Tree for clients and families is being trialled by National Disability Services throughout Queensland. Professor Muenchberger says it will bring clarity to a complex array of options.

"It has been a challenge for people to identify what their skills and information needs are and who can deliver these, but this pre-planning tool will support that process," Professor Muenchberger said.

"It assists people to make sense of self-direction, to identify where they are on the self-direction journey, and where to go next. There is nothing else like it in the market.

"The evidence-base for disability care and support models and tools are evolving, but more consumer-centred research can always be done. The challenge is to make research findings meaningful and directly relevant to the community."

The introduction of the NDIS will bring choice, control and independence where there wasn't any for people with a disability. For the first time, people can self-direct the use of their funding packages - within certain guidelines - leading to truly individualised support.

The research is funded by Endeavour Foundation's Endowment Challenge Fund. The fund was established in 2009 to support research which addresses significant issues for the Australian disability sector.

My Choices Tree
Self Directed Literature Review Final
Research Summary GU Self direction

Contacts

Endeavour Foundation: Kirrily Boulton, National Media and Communications Manager,
Mobile: 0429 077 886
Email: k.boulton@endeavour.com.au

Griffith University:
Heidi Muenchberger: h.muenchberger@griffith.edu.au
Michelle Crozier: m.crozier@griffith.edu.au

Research confronts end-of-life care and drug treatments for autism among people with intellectual disability

Intellectual disability researchers can now strike out into new territory, thanks to $70,000 in grants awarded today by the Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund.

A joint University of New England (UNE) and University of Sydney research project, led by Professor Rafat Hussain (UNE School of Rural Medicine), will be the first to look at palliative care options for people with an intellectual disability in rural and metropolitan Australia and develop a pilot framework for the future.

Chairman of the Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund Board Grant Murdoch said the $40,000 grant recognised end-of-life care as a growing challenge and welcomed research which could guide disability service providers.

"As Australia prepares for the introduction of DisabilityCare there has been continuing debate over the transition from disability support to aged care," Mr Murdoch said.

"Better health care has delivered a gradual increase in life expectancy for people with an intellectual disability and introduced a new set of challenges around ageing and palliative care," he said.

"It is generally accepted that we should support terminally ill people to remain living at home until their death. However complex legal issues face organisations that want to support people with impaired decision-making capacity to remain at home until their death, along with medical issues and access to appropriate allied health care.

"This important research will improve quality of life for older people with an intellectual disability and guide in-home palliative care options into the future," Mr Murdoch said.

University of Sydney Brain and Mind Research Institute PhD Candidate Ben Johnston has also been awarded $5,000 for research using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to examine whether drug treatments could address neural abnormalities among children with a combined diagnosis of autism and intellectual disability. The research will target oxytocin modulated plasticity, a key factor in parent-child bonding and the formation of relationships.

In order to carry out this innovative research program, Mr Johnston will first develop training programs which will enable children with autism to undergo MRI without the use of sedatives or anaesthesia.

Practice sessions on a mock MRI scanner, Social Stories, Picture Exchange Communication, video modelling and specialist communication aids will be developed to familiarise children with MRI procedure so they can comfortably participate in the research.

"We believe the training program will deliver immediate and tangible benefits because children with autism often find it impossible to cope with the noise, confined space and change of environment involved in having an MRI," Mr Murdoch said.

The 2013 Organisation Award of $20,000 has been awarded to Parramatta YMCA, to enable children with an intellectual disability to be included in school holiday camps.

Mr Murdoch said the grant would fund formal carers to support children with intellectual disability attending holiday camps, and would provide training for YMCA camp staff to sustain ongoing inclusion.

"The camps create a positive environment for children to develop social skills, including learning how to make friends and develop peer relationships and will deliver ongoing benefits to all campers and staff involved, not just young people with an intellectual disability," Mr Murdoch said.

Another $5,000 Student Research Grant has been awarded to UNE School of Rural Medicine doctoral student Miranda Cannon to look at how people with an intellectual disability can be supported to age in place, avoiding premature entry to institutional aged care.

The Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund is a public benevolent institution that seeks to benefit the wider Australian disability sector as a whole, with an emphasis on people with an intellectual disability.

The Endowment Challenge Fund is a capital-preserved fund where donations made to the fund are invested and the interest earned is used to support Endowment Challenge Fund activities.

The Fund provides grants to researchers and postgraduate students undertaking research into significant issues for the Australian disability sector.

Research explores self-directed care coordination and competency development for people with a disability

Researchers based at Griffith University in Brisbane will investigate the issues faced by people with a disability leading up to the introduction of a National Disability Insurance Scheme thanks to a major grant from the Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund.

Associate Professor, Heidi Muenchberger, and her co-researchers Dr Carolyn Ehrlich, Anna Cox and PhD candidate, Michelle Crozier, are the recipients of the annual $30,000 Research Award from the Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund, a public benevolent institution which funds research to benefit Australians with a disability.

Their project, entitled “Engagement with people with intellectual disabilities and their carers: self-directed care coordination and competency development”, will explore how well current care and support processes address the needs of younger adults and will also develop and test a skills competency package for client-led coordination of care.

Two Student Awards from the Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund, worth $5,000 each, have been given to the PhD candidates Linda Steele at the University of Sydney’s Law School and Sarah MacDonald of the School of Social Work and Human Services at the University of Queensland.

Ms Steele’s project “Cognitive Disability, Diversion and the Criminal Law: Disrupting the Criminalisation of People, with Cognitive Disability in the Criminal Justice System” focuses on developing an understanding of how Section 32 of the Mental Health (Forensic Provisions) Act 1990 (NSW) can challenge the criminalisation of defendants with cognitive or intellectual disability by addressing contributory broader contexts.

“I am hoping that this will provide a greater understanding of how diversion can be more effectively used to challenge the criminalisation of people with cognitive disability in the criminal justice system,” she said.

“This can be drawn upon by disability service providers and disability rights and social justice advocates in their ongoing advocacy and service provision in this area.”

Ms MacDonald’s research “Making the Transition to Adulthood: Perspectives and experiences of young people with an intellectual disability who have exited non-kinship foster care” centres on young people with an intellectual disability leaving out-of-home care who are a vulnerable group, many of whom experience negative adult life outcomes and aren’t identified by support systems. She hopes her research will be used to inform improved policy and social network practice.

The Non-profit Organisation Award worth $15,000 goes to Rosie’s Place based in Rooty Hill in western Sydney.

Rosie’s Place is a community counselling service for children, young people and their non-offending family members who have experienced sexual assault and/or domestic violence. It also provides training to workers in the trauma field.

It will use the grant to develop a personal safety program targeting young women with an intellectual disability. A project worker will be employed to develop an eight week program and trial it with four small groups of 8-10 young women. The resources will be made available to other service providers.

The Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund, a capital-protected reserve of donations, gives grants to individuals and organisations to increase social inclusion for people with a disability.

The goal is to encourage quality and innovation in the disability services sector, by providing grants to researchers and postgraduate students undertaking research into significant issues for the Australian disability sector.

Grants will also be made to support the engagement and broader participation by persons with a disability so that they can have the choices of ordinary life.

A total of 38 applications were received across the three award categories and a Project Assessment Panel was established to review applications and make recommendations for funding to the Endeavour Foundation Endowment Challenge Fund Board.

Endeavour Foundation has been supporting people with a disability for more than 60 years